J Patrick + Associates Blog

The Bottom Line: The Pros & Cons of Contract Work

Posted by Glenda Gregorio on Tue, May 07, 2019 @ 04:02 PM

Contract Work

 

The word on the street in Silicon Valley is that we are currently in a “gig economy,” that is, more and more people are opting for contract work as opposed to traditional full-time employment. According to new research, conducted by labor economists Lawrence F. Katz and Alan B. Krueger, between 2005 and 2015 the number of Americans seeking alternative work arrangements swelled by 9.4 million. The large move towards contract employment can be explained by several factors from the need for flexible work hours to increased autonomy.

But, if you find yourself thinking about joining the growing ranks of contract workers, you need to first understand the pro and cons of this kind of work.

 

PRO: Potential for Higher Earnings

Hiring contractors provide the flexibility companies need as it saves time, money and resources. Companies are also going to hire you because you’re an expert in your field. You know what to do and how to get it done in a timely manner, which is what companies look for in contractors. It is important to understand that most contractors are considered experts in their fields, so you will be rewarded for your expertise.

 

CON: Increased Uncertainty

The potential for higher earnings is a great benefit of contract work, but there’s no guarantee you will keep working once a contract expires. And since the nature of the work you’ve been hired to do is finite, you have no guarantee that you’ll make the money you thought you would. Another thing to consider is that the project you were hired to work on can be unexpectedly canceled. All of these factors can add up to increased financial instability --if you’re not working, you’re not getting paid. And finally, there’s no way of knowing the amount of time you’ll spend between contracts.  

 

PRO: Lifestyle Flexibility

According to Randstad’s Workforce360 Study, about 86% of independent contractors reported their level of job satisfaction to be good/excellent. With contract work comes more freedom, you’re able to control your career path without having to wade through office politics for a promotion, pay raise or time off. You negotiate to get the employment packages that suit you the most, and you take as much or as little time off in between contracts. If this type of flexibility is appealing to you, this will help boost your professional and personal satisfaction.  

 

CON: Outside Looking In

All that flexibility may be nice, but the price you pay is that you’ll always be the outsider.  Contract work makes it difficult to create ties, connections which might help advance your career further down the road... There’s also a lack of social engagement. As we all know, you spend more time at work than at home, so your social life tends to stem from your work life. Some in-house employees may not be inclined to get to know you because you’ll be with the company for a limited amount of time.

 

PRO: Increased Technical & Professional Knowledge

You’re the expert in your field and have a certain skill set that companies in your industry want. But, contract work also provides the opportunity to sharpen your expertise and work in different sectors. It allows you to broaden your experience in your field and perhaps gain new skills in other industries while you’re at it. You’re at liberty to choose the skills that you would like to further develop in other industries, allowing you to enhance your CV and marketability for future jobs. It can also be part of your story when explaining an employment gap to a potential employer.

 

CON: Career Development

The freedom provided by contract work to broaden your technical and professional skills means that you are in charge of your own development. Great, right? Maybe not. Although it feels empowering to be in charge of your own career development, it is a heavy burden to bear. You no longer have the human resources department or a talent management team to ensure that you’re properly trained and qualified for the job. It is now up to you to make sure that your skill set is up to par with the current trends of the industry.

Like everything in life, contract employment has its benefits and drawbacks. Although it is not a career-long plan, if you’re returning back to the workforce or need a flexible work arrangement, contract work might be a viable option.

 

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Tags: Job Search, Job Interviews, Career Strategies

7 Reasons You Need To Talk To A Recruiter

Posted by Nicholas Stearns on Thu, May 02, 2019 @ 11:10 AM

Love_Your_Job-_2.png

 

When you’re happy in your job, taking calls from recruiters may seem counter-intuitive. But it’s actually one of the best times to speak with a headhunter.

 

Here are 7 reasons why:

 

1. There’s A Lot To Be Gained

Your time is worth a lot and you don’t want to waste it, so it’s understandable if you don’t want to hear about another job opportunity. But, the good recruiter knows how to get to the point, and they won’t take an inordinate amount of time, yet hey very well may have a lot to offer. It’s worth a few minutes to learn about possible opportunities in your field and to make a connection with a respected recruiter. And all it costs is a bit of your lunch break.

 

2. They Know How Green The Grass Is

You may not think you’re interested in leaving your current job but recruiters often work to fill positions that aren’t entirely public yet. Talking to a good headhunter gives you insight into the possibilities in your industry as they are often on the leading edge of trends and market movement. It's highly possible they are working on filling jobs that you’d have no other way of knowing about, and it could very well \turn out to be the perfect next step.

 

3. The Future Isn’t Now

Even if none of the jobs the recruiter has to offer are what you want, remember,  this phone call is not wasted time. Save their number, ask them to keep you in mind for future openings, and then keep doing what you love. Just because they don’t have the perfect opening for you right now, doesn’t mean that in 6 months or 3 years that your dream position won’t be open. Or that your situation will be the same. Relationships with recruiters are not entirely about getting you a job. For more on that read here.

 

4. Companies Change

Situations have a habit of changing. Companies go through restructuring, and positions get overhauled. Managers and coworkers get promoted or go to another company. The company you love today may not be the same in 5 years. Maintaining your relationship with a recruiter is a great way to keep your options open without having to make any commitments.

 

5. You Change Too

What you enjoy and find challenging will also evolve over time. And sometimes, in order to find the roles that can help you meet those challenges, you need to move organizations. After all, the average employee in America can expect to have anywhere from 10 to 15 different jobs in their career. And this is where having a relationship with a recruiter helps; they’ll be there when you’re ready.

 

6. A Chance Market Research

Recruiters work in your field all the time, and they tend to know the average value of your position. A conversation with a headhunter is a  great way to do some of your own market research. You may find that your current compensation is not equal to the market, or you may find out how good you have it, and quell any thoughts about moving jobs. Another value recruiters add is they can give you insight into what other industries are looking for people with your skill set.

 

7. Lending A Helping Hand

Just because the job isn’t something you’re interested in, you may very well know someone who is. Many recruiting firms offer a referral program. 10 minutes on the phone might not get you a job, but it could advance a friend’s career, and earn you a bonus.

A call from a recruiter, especially when you’re in a great spot, can look like a bother. But when you know about the added value, you realize it’s an opportunity to learn more about your industry and the space you work in.

 

If you’re interested in speaking to a recruiter about your career path or job search to see if there’s a role that's a good fit for you, CLICK HERE.  

 

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Tags: Career Advice

5 Cyber Security Certifications You Need To Get Ahead

Posted by Dylan Rivera on Wed, May 01, 2019 @ 12:39 PM

certification

With the recent spate of cyber attacks, Cyber Security professionals are in more demand than ever. Businesses are flooding the gates, looking for qualified info-sec professionals to safeguard their IT systems from attacks. There are plenty of jobs waiting for well-qualified candidates.

Chances are you're like most cybersecurity professionals- you're not looking for just any job. What you're seeking for are the best challenges at that best companies. And in order to get those jobs, you're going to need to hone your skills.

 We’ve compiled a list of the top certifications to pursue if you're looking to expand your market value and/or expertise:

 

1. CompTIA Security

This entry-level certification is the essential stepping stone into your IT security career. It is globally recognized as a validation of superior technical skills, such as Cryptography, Identity Management, Security Risk Identification, etc. To qualify, you must have 6-12 months of relevant experience.

COST: $311.00 USD.

Positions and the average salaries that correspond with the CompTIA Security+:

  • Systems Administrator ($43,000-$86,000)
  • Network Engineer ($46,000-$95,000)
  • Information Security Analyst ($49,000-$96,000)
  • Network Administrator ($39,000-$77,000)
  • IT Manager ($44,000-$110,000)

2. GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC)

This entry-level information security certification is for professionals who want proof that they're ready for a hands-on job in systems security administration. This exam covers a wide range of subjects to further help you understand and recognize security principles.

COST: $1000.00 USD,

Note: This certification requires no prior experience, but you’ll have to retake the test every four years.

Positions and average salaries that corresponds with the GSEC certification:

  • Information Security Analyst ($46,000-$121,000)
  • Security Engineer ($100,0000-$110,000)
  • Network Security Engineer ($80,000-$85,000)
  • Senior Security Consultant ($100,000-$135,000)
  • Network Security Analyst ($50,000-$55,000)

3. Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)

This intermediate-level certification trains and educates you to understand and look for weaknesses and vulnerabilities in information systems. This credential will equip you with the knowledge of numerous hacking practices (Trojans, Viruses) and how to properly defend yourself against them.

COST: $500.00 USD

Note: This cert requires 2 years of relevant experience to be qualified.

Positions and average salaries that corresponds with the CEH accreditation:

  • Information Security Analyst ($53,000-$107,000)
  • Security Engineer ($61,000-$120,000)
  • Penetration Tester ($50,000-$130,000)
  • Security Analyst ($51,000-$115,000)
  • Information Security Engineer ($72,000-$135,000)

4. Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)

This advanced-level certification goes beyond the basic technical skills and covers the integration of security methodologies. The CISSP is the gold standard when it comes to certifications by preparing you with the right tools to develop, guide, and manage security principals.

COST: $600.00 USD

Note: This certification is a highly recognized standard among the industry; however, you must have a minimum of 5 years of experience to qualify for the exam.

Positions and average salaries that corresponds with the CISSP credential:

  • Information Security Analyst ($60,000-$117,000)
  • Information Security Manager ($81,000-$142,000)
  • Chief Information Security Officer ($104,000-$203,000)
  • Security Engineer ($69,000-$127,000)
  • Security Architect ($90,000-$152,000)

5. Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

This top-level certification will showcase your security management expertise. Further, advance your security risk management and program development skills with this unique management-focused credential. Globally recognized to demonstrate your understanding of an information security program and its relationship with the long and short term business goals.

COST: $500-$700.00 USD

Note: You must have a minimum of 5 years working experience.

Positions and average salaries that corresponds with the CISM accreditation:

  • Information Security Manager ($82,000-$150,000)
  • Chief Information Security Officer ($116,000-$214,000)
  • Information Security Officer ($66,000-$147,000)
  • Security Architect, IT ($84,000-$172,000)
  • Information Security Analyst ($55,000- $122,000)

Though the majority of employers might not list specific cybersecurity certifications as a job requirement, having certs in place will help you stand out and increase your appeal for top-drawer jobs, as well as increase your salary potential.

 

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3 Recruiting Models: How To Get The Best Fit For Your Business

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Wed, May 01, 2019 @ 10:16 AM

different recruiting models

 

You contract with an executive recruiting firm for the benefit of their expertise and the quality of their relationships. You know working with recruiters may cost you more than your in-house HR department, but they're worth the price. But, just as there is no such thing as one-size-fits-all hiring practices, there isn’t just one engagement model.

Knowing the difference between contingency search, retained search and the new, innovative option known as the hybrid recruiting model, can mean the difference between making the right hire and losing time and money on an unproductive search.

 

Let’s explore all three of these recruiting models. 

 

CONTINGENCY SEARCH

You're No Risk Option. Signing a letter of agreement for a contingency search is binding only IF the search results in a hire. Yes, you’ll have agreed to a percentage of the closing salary, but if the recruiters don’t bring you the A-level talent you’re seeking, then the search doesn't cost you anything. You’re not bound by an exclusivity agreement and can work with multiple search firms at once. And most firms offer a guarantee period, anywhere from 30-90 days. The recruiters carry all the risk- if they don’t deliver, you don’t pay.

But Nothing Is Truly Free. Contingency searches can often be costlier, carrying higher percentage fees. And what you might not get is fully-dedicated resources or the full force of the search team’s focus to fill your positions. With no guarantee of payment, firms will only dedicate so much of their time and resources to your search.

 

RETAINED SEARCH

We’re There For You. There are some hires, such as C-level suite and marketing managers, that are just too important to leave to chance. You need a focused search dedicated to building your team. When you engage a recruiter in a retained search, they’ll be looking not only for the candidates with the right resumes, but also mining for hidden talent -- candidates who are primed to take on new challenges but may fly under the radar. This is where the recruiter’s reach and relationships come into play. You get all their time and attention focused on your search by paying them an exclusive, pre-determined percentage of the final salary. Usually payable in three installments (1/3 at the time of engagement, 1/3 at an agreed upon point in the middle of the process, and the last installment rounded out based on the actual salary). With this model, you know your money is hard at work for you.

What Will It Cost You. Retained searches are structured to mitigate the risk for both you and the recruiter. However, in the event that the search does not end in a successful hire for either internal or external reasons, that first 1/3 of the fee is non-recoverable- though many firms will apply it to a future search. This is the time to work with a search firm whom you trust and who has a solid, long-standing reputation in your business sector.

 

THE HYBRID RECRUITING MODEL

Quality Service At A Discount. You need quality talent, and you need it fast, but you’re not looking to pay premium recruiting fees. You may be a start-up needing to fill out staff, or an established firm looking to test the waters with a new recruiter. Either way, the Hybrid model may be the perfect solution for your staffing needs. You’ll pay an engagement fee, but in exchange for a small outlay at the beginning, you’ll get treated like a retained client AND you’ll pay a discounted rate. The upfront fee is deductible from the final percentage based on starting salary. Think of it as a down payment. Recruiters like it because they get a targeted search that’s more than likely to end in a hire, and you get exclusive service at a discount.

Is There A Downside? Sure there is, but it’s pretty slim for you. The only way your engagement fee won’t go to work for you is if the recruiting firm can’t fill any of your staffing needs within the agreed upon specified time, and even then the fee can be applied to a future search.

There are, of course, other models for engagement, solutions that are tailored to special needs, such as filling out a new branch or for contracting short-term hires. If you find yourself faced with one of these situations, talk to your recruiter and explore what works best for you.

 

Related blog:

HOW AN EXECUTIVE RECRUITING FIRM CAN HELP SOLVE YOUR HIRING PROBLEMS

 

Does the Hybrid-Recruiting Model sound right for your company, or are you looking to build a relationship with a trusted firm? J.Patrick & Associates is an Executive Search firm specializing in Information Technologies. Let us help you explore which type of search is the best fit for your company. If your companies seeking talent acquisition and having trouble with the hiring process, feel free to connect with a J. Patrick recruiter by clicking below. We’ll talk to you about which recruiting strategy is best for you then start producing qualified candidates asap.

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Tags: HR and Hiring, recruiting

How to Start off Right As an AV Technician

Posted by Dylan Rivera on Tue, Apr 30, 2019 @ 04:04 PM

bigstock-Technician-using-laptop-in-ser-109998236.jpg

With the Audio-Visual industry continuing to thrive, the demand for technicians has outpaced the supply. Opportunities are plentiful for qualified technicians, even if they haven’t worked in AV before, with the caveat that they possess some fundamental skills required in the audio-visual space.

If you’re looking to move into this growing field, here’s what companies are looking for in their entry-level AV technicians.

 

Ability to Learn

When you enter the AV field, you’ll need a propensity for working with electrical equipment since the AV space requires you to work with different audio, video, and computer technology. There are several related fields that can help make the shift into AV easier, such as:

- Photography

- Creative Media Production

- Audio Production

- Digital Media Technology

While work in these areas does not necessarily prepare you for the particulars of AV tech, they do give you a working knowledge of some of the equipment, as well as the vocabulary of the field.

 

Walking the Walk

Employers who are willing to hire techs from outside AV are going to first and foremost be looking for work experience -- most likely 3-5 years in a related field. You’ll also need to build a familiarity with the different applications (Commercial Businesses, Residential Homes, Government, Healthcare) and the equipment/ manufacturers (Extron, AMX, Crestron and DSP) associated with each sector. Improving your knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming can all prove your ability to adapt to different settings. Also, keeping an updated portfolio with testimonials, pictures, and/or schemas will help give an in-depth representation of how you’ve performed in the past.

 

Talking the Talk

As a post-sales or pre-sales technician, the ability to communicate with customers and co-workers is an imperative tool to keep holstered to your work belt. The ability to explain the process in layman terms, or in a manner that requires no prior knowledge in the designated area is highly valued. Working in this space demands that you must be able to meet customer demands and resolve any problems that may appear. Following the installation process, customers will often have questions regarding the procedure and last minute “How to’s,” and covering those questions will fall to you.

 

Thinking on the Spot

Out in the field, AV service technicians are often faced with numerous situations where they need to thoroughly analyze an obstacle and create a solution. The problem may be as complex as having to troubleshoot a Crestron system, or as rudimentary as coming up with an on-the-spot solution to limited space when hanging monitors in a university common room. Regardless of the size, you need to be prepared for unforeseen complications and be to efficiently diagnose a problem in order to produce a worthy solution.

 

Attitude

Similar to a pitcher throwing a curveball, unpredictable complications arise on the job. However, the way you handle your attitude and take control of the situation will ultimately determine the outcome. A strong and positive attitude influences the customer experience. You will be the face of the company out in the field, you need to be comfortable in that role as a brand ambassador. Remember to keep your head high, even in the most arduous situations.

 

With the right set of qualifications, and an interest in working on the user end, being an AV tech can be a most rewarding career trajectory.

 

Looking for a full time or part time AV job? Click the link below to connect with a recruiter and find out what's available for you! 

 

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9 Programs Leading the Way For Girls in Tech

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Tue, Apr 30, 2019 @ 03:20 PM

10 Programs Leading The Way For Girls in Tech.png

According to The National Center for Women in IT, tech companies with women in management positions achieve a 34% higher return on investment.

34% higher return.

And yet women still only occupy 26% of the over 4 million computer science-related positions in the country and account for only 11% of executives in Fortune 500 tech companies.

Not only is the lack of diversity in tech profoundly out of line, but it's also bad for business, especially when we

The good news is that a good number of organizations and initiatives have cropped up around the country to change the game. Some are focusing on girls still in school, others on offering training to women already out in the workforce. But what unites all of these organizations is the belief that not only should women be occupying an equal share of the over 3 million tech jobs, but that they are in fact the future of tech.

Here's a rundown of 10 of the leading not-for-profits and organizations working to forge a path to get more girls in tech, and to help women make their mark in the industry.

 

1. Girls Who Code

The US-based program has taught over 40,000 girls to code to date. They offer both after school clubs which are open to 6th-12th-grade girls, and summer immersion programs for 10th-11th-grade girls which take place at leading technology companies. With locations in 42 states, they are driven by the single mandate to close the gender gap in the technology sector.

Brook view House in Dorchester, Ma, an organization dedicated to helping homeless families develop life-skills and training has opened their own chapter of #girlswhocode. This kind of outreach to underserved communities is actively changing lives. Not only are they empowering girls who might not have ever thought they were entitled to a career, but they are also laying the very foundation these girls to launch successful careers in tech.

 

2. Black Girls Code

Black Girls Code's vision is to: "increase the number of women of color in the digital space by empowering girls of color ages 7 to 17 to become innovators in STEM fields, leaders in their communities, and builders of their own futures through exposure to computer science and technology. To provide African-American youth with the skills to occupy some of the 1.4 million computing job openings expected to be available in the U.S. by 2020, and to train 1 million girls by 2040."

And they're succeeding. By reaching out to underrepresented communities to teach coding on platforms such as Ruby on Rails and scratch, Black Girls Code is engaging girls who might never have been introduced to tech in their schools. Through programming and game design they are preparing black girls to not only take their place in the tech sector but to become the designers of their own futures.

 

3. Code.org 

A not-for-profit organization, Code.org is dedicated to expanding access to computer science to underrepresented populations and girls. They also provide professional learning programs for teachers to integrate CS into their classrooms, are working to set up policies supporting CS and partnering with school districts to add CS to the curriculum.

Their Hour Of Code initiative, a free one-hour tutorial designed to provide a fun and easy introduction to coding is available in 45 languages and has been implementing in over 180 countries.

 

4. Womanity

This not-for-profit has set out to empower girls and women in developing countries and to help accelerate progress within their communities. Inspired by the UN Sustainable Development Goals, their mission is to

  • Support girls and women’s access to quality education and vocational training.
  • Create employment, revenue generation and professional career opportunities for women.
  • Promote avenues that give women a voice in society, politics and governance institutions.
  • Protect women and girls’ physical and psychological integrity.

Case in point is their Girls Can Code initiative in Afghanistan. Working in accordance with the Ministry of Education, they have been able to build the intensive introduction to coding for girls in Kabul.

In other words, they are working within cultures to help create a path for women and girls to succeed.

 

5. Built By Girls

#builtbygirls is one of the organizations leading the way past simply teaching girls to code. As stated on their homepage, they recognize that there are countless opportunities for careers in tech and they've made it their mandate to prepare girls to innovate and lead.

Wave Utilizing a devoted mobile platform, this mentorship connects girls 15-18 years old with mentors in the technology sector. Over the course of 9 months, the program pairs each of the 150 girls with 3 mentors, based on the girl's areas of interest. the 3 month period with each mentor is spent in communication in which the 2 will solve a hypothetical problem related to that business or sector. Much of the communication takes place through the app, but the program also includes a monthly visit.

At the end of the 3 months, the mentor then introduces their student to 2 relevant contacts from their network - meaning that upon the completion of the program, each student will have a minimum of 9 contacts in her field of interest.

The program launched with 150 girls, but has the goal of including 20,000 girls by 202. If they hit their mark, that means those girls will have made over 90,000 connections in the tech sector.

Girls Who Fund On the VC/startup end of the business, #builtbygirls offers a summer apprenticeship program for college-bound girls at BBG Ventures, an early-stage seed fund investing in consumer tech startups with at least one female founder.

During the month-long program, girls learn the fundamentals of running a startup, study the bones of venture capital (VC). They also are afforded the amazing opportunity to not only meet leaders in the VC field but to also sit in on pitch meetings.

The internship concludes with the girls judging the #BUILTBYGIRLSChallenge, a pitch competition for tech products built by girls.

 

6. Girl Develop It (GDI)

What began with one class offered in NYC in 2010 has since blossomed into an organization with chapters in over 56 US cities. GDI provides low-cost training for women to learn web and software development. Their focus is on providing a judgment-free experience where women of all backgrounds and economic levels can learn new skills while increasing their confidence and career prospects. And it seems that they are succeeding, as their organization represents over 55,000 women to date.

 

7. Rails Girls

Founded in Finland, Rails Girls has now blossomed into a global not-for-profit community. Sponsoring events that are organized by volunteers, Rails Girls focuses on providing women with the tools, the knowledge, and the vocabulary to build out their ideas. By making technology more approachable they are empowering a new generation of business owners, entrepreneurs, and content providers.

 

8. Railsbridge

Also born out of a single workshop, this one in San Francisco in 2010, Railsbridge is devoted to creating diversity in tech: not only gender but race, sexual orientation, ability, and class. While their first workshops might have focused on women, they have since expanded their scope.

As they say, they "value acceptance, enthusiasm, and hard work. The RailsBridge community thrives on optimism and a love for making great things."

 

9. Codechix

Dedicated to education, advocacy, and mentorship, Codechix's aim is to increase the number of women engineers in both industry and academia. And a big part of that mission is to focus on retention. According to their website, 56% of women engineers drop out of the industry within 10 years. One of the best ways to stem that tide is to do exactly what Codechix is doing: fostering opportunities for face-to-face communication, community building, and mentorship.

To this end, they "conduct events, participate in competitions as a team, develop open-source projects on our Github repository and actively network to create a foundation for women engineers on the technical ladder in software and hardware."

There are countless other initiatives and organizations all working to foster diversity in tech, we'll explore some of the professional organizations in a future blog, and continue to delve into this issue on an ongoing basis.

 

All 9 of these programs are supporting women in technology a great deal. A lot of which starting the help in middle school / high school and turning these girls into professional women who can then stem careers from their skill.

 

Interested in looking through some of our current tech openings? Click here

 

Related Blog:

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photo credit: Paul Bergmeir

Tags: hiriring, Women in Tech

Weighing Your Options Between Two Competing Offers

Posted by Dylan Rivera on Thu, Apr 25, 2019 @ 01:39 PM

Two Competing Job Offers

  

Congratulations!

Your job search and interview process have finally paid off, however with two competing offers, with each presenting certain benefits that make it a good fit.  

The first thing you should do is just take a moment and remind yourself that some people would riot to be in the position you are in.

Now, let’s break down some points to help you evaluate how to best handle the “tow job offers” situation.  

 

Written In Ink

When presented with multiple job offers, it’s natural to start comparing them immediately. However, it’s not wise to do so until you have a physical copy rather than just verbal offers of both opportunities. You want to be able to weigh several vital factors, such as health benefits, vacation time, maternity leave, commute time against each other. All of these important data points should be measured as concretely as possible.

Also remember, without a written offer, your negotiating power is limited since you're basing all of your facts off a verbal agreement.

So get it in writing and don't forget to read the fine print!     

 

Be Honest

When you encounter this kind of situation, it’s common to ask yourself if you should tell one company about the other offer.  In some cases, one offer may require a decision before you've received the specifics from the other proposal. If you have the opportunity to review both offers without spilling the beans then you should do so. It’s possible for a company to feel as if you're trying to shake them down or force them into a bidding war by revealing the other offer.

If you’re cornered and have no other option but to tell the company about the other offer, then do so carefully. An example would be:

“I am appreciative of your offer, and the thought of joining your company is very exciting, but I will be honest and tell you that there is another offer that is currently pending, and I’d like some time to weigh all my options.”

You will always run the possibility of them saying no or stripping the deal; however, hopefully, they’ll respect you for being honest. And in the end, you can thank them for making your decision a lot easier.

 

Break-It-Down

Once you have both written offers in hand, you should start with writing down what specifically you want from the new job, but also keeping an eye out for any red flags. Health insurance, good company culture, there are so many different variables to take into accounting especially with multiple offers.

This shouldn't be a quick process where you immediately run to the offer with the highest salary. You’ll be spending a good deal of your time in this new position, so make sure to consider all factors and not just the obvious ones. To make this process a little easier, consider making a S.W.O.T analysis or another form of a comparison grid.

Before considering the negatives, start mapping out all of the benefits from each proposal. Only after you’ve compared the potential benefits is it time to move on to review the negatives. Factors, such as work environment, travel distance, and your overall happiness should be given the utmost consideration.

The simple act of physically writing them down allows you to grasp a better understanding of the benefits of both offers.

 

Take A Walk

Take a break. After all, it’s what you do when you need to blow off some steam or if you've hit a rough patch at work. It’s essential that you give some yourself some time to think and clear your mind. When you're stuck in one way of thinking, find some sort of distraction, whether it be watching a movie or reading a book. Just make sure you get out, let loose, and let the two offers be the last thing your mind for a little while.

Though this kind of situation can become stressful, you must ultimately choose what feels right for you. Consider everything that is important, make your decision, and never look back.

We all have that inner wisdom lying in the bottom of our stomach -- Listen to it.

 



Hoped you enjoyed our blog about choosing between two jobs! If you’re a job seeker looking for more career advice please click here to check out more of our blogs!

 

 

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Leaders Are Made, Not Born

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Thu, Apr 25, 2019 @ 12:01 PM

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“Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.” - Jack Welch

Let’s get this straight from the get-go; there is no such thing as a natural born leader. Regardless of how much power and influence one may have been born into, leadership skills are learned. Sure, it comes easier to some and we can’t ignore that there are those who enjoy a quicker route to the top, but in order to stay there, to keep growing their influence, they had to cultivate some key qualities.

Leadership is not a title, it’s a mindset, a way of being. Whether you have your sights on management, the C-level Suite, or run your own business, you’d do well to begin integrating these qualities into your everyday life now, for habits only become habits with practice.

 

Here are 6 things great leaders know.

 

  • They Speak Less, Listen More

The only way to get a broad understanding of any situation is to first listen to what other’s have to say. Take everything in, consider all sides of the story before formulating your response. Then, once you’ve considered what it is you want to contribute, concision is the key to effective communication.

When you are willing to listen more and speak less, others will feel more valued if you are willing to hear them out. When you do speak, people will be far more apt to listen.

 

  • They Value Integrity

A good leader, one who motivates and drives a successful team, is first and foremost a model of reliability and accountability. Reliability is won by doing what you say you’re going to do when you said you’re going to do it. And then going one step further to take responsibility should things go sideways.

 

  • They Are Always Adapting

There has to be more than one solution to any given problem, and a good leader knows this to be true. Rigidity kills innovation, leaving no room for new ideas to bloom. Certainly, there may be standards and procedures that must be adhered to, but a good leader leaves room for creativity to bloom.

 

  • They Communicate

While this may sound at first like a contradiction of Speak less, Listen more, it’s, in fact, an important pillar of good leadership. Assumptions not only cause conflict and wasted time and resources, but they also diminish trust. Once again concision is the key - it takes less time to communicate clearly with your boss, your team, your customers than it does to clean up the mess left behind by confusion and miscommunication.

 

  • They Know It’s All In The Timing

Patience is a virtue, so we are told, and it’s also a key to understanding what true leadership means. Now is not always the best time to hold that meeting, to send that email, to ask your boss to assign you to that project. Just as entrepreneurs know that there must be a period of sacrifice before success, planning ahead and being willing to be patient often means the rewards will be all the sweeter.

 

  • They Know the Goal.

The point of being a leader is not glory or accolades, or even the biggest office. In business, the goal to build a strong company and ensure that everyone succeeds. Ego, selfishness, competition and other cut-throat tactics might get you ahead in the short term, but a career to be proud of is built on stronger material.

Great leaders are not born, they are made from integrity, respect and hard work. The pace of your leadership development will have a direct impact on your leadership abilities down the line and how you grow to be an effective leader.

 

Are you looking for a new position to help you meet your leadership goals? If so, let J.Patrick & Associates hunt for you!

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Sales Engineer Salary Pie Chart

Posted by Daniel Sullivan on Wed, Apr 24, 2019 @ 10:02 AM

Sales Engineer Salary Pie Chart

Sales Engineer Salary Pie Chart

 

The Sales Engineer Salary 

Here at J. Patrick, we performed a Salary survey with salaries submitted anonymously, asking over 350 Sales engineers their 1-year salary. Above were the results.  As you can see from the graph we had a wide range of different salaries. Considering that we are a recruiter who specializes in placing Sales Engineers, we find it unacceptable that the highest percentage of salaries was the lowest amount on this chart, over 12% of the survey takers make under $65,000.  

 

According to Glassdoor, the average salary/annual salary for a sales engineer is $101,015 (national average). Salary ranges from about $60,000 to $200,000 depending on years of experience and performance.

 

If you would like to complete this survey, just select this link here:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JPatrick

 

 

Looking for your next move? Check out our available Sales Engineer Jobs

 

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4 Ways to make the most of an Employment Gap

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Fri, Apr 19, 2019 @ 02:21 PM

Make the most of an employment gap

 

As a job seeker, ready to return to work after a hiatus (either planned or involuntary) accounting for a gap in employment can be daunting. But whether you’ve been out of the job market for a few months or a number of years, there are a number of things you can do to ensure that prospective employers view your hiatus as time well spent, rather than damaging blank space on your resume.

 

1. Embrace the Gap

As much as you may want to try to make an employment gap disappear when getting back into the workforce, you must embrace it and fill the gaps. You are much better off accounting for it than trying to make believe it never happened. If for example, your hiatus was devoted to raising children, include it as such on your resume: 2014-2019 Time off to stay at home with my children/care for parents, etc. Be clear and honest, and know that having taken time off doesn’t make you a less valuable employment prospect.

 

2. Highlight Volunteer Work

It may be tempting to minimize the impact volunteer work may have on your career, but if you step back, you'll see that you gained valuable skills and experience by working with a non-for profit institution or school. By highlighting this experience you are showing prospective employers that you are willing to use your skills to be a positive force in your community, that you are passionate about certain causes, and you are engaged in building new skill sets.

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Don’t forget to avail yourself of those connections you made when volunteering when you’re looking for your next position. Even if they are not able to help connect you with prospective employers, they can write recommendations for your LinkedIn profile and provide you with endorsements.

 

3. Keep Learning 

Employers will be less apt to balk at a gap if you’ve been busy working on your education. And understand this is not a bias that’s limited to University or degree work. Take the time during your hiatus to get current with certifications and training and learn new skills. Employers will see you’ve been dedicated to keeping your skill sharp, and are returning up to date with the latest trends in your sector.

 

4. Practice Your Story 

When it comes to the interview, you need to be able to explain your hiatus in a way that allows you to be seen as an exciting prospect. Don't fall to the temptation to apologize for your hiatus. All that's called for is a concise explanation to help remove any doubts about your readiness and appeal to a potential employer. Know what you have to offer and be ready to voice it in just a few sentences. Understanding how to tell your story may take some time and practice, but it will deliver dividends when you are pitching yourself for a job.

Practice telling your story with both friends and people who don't know you so well - it will help strengthen your pitch and work out any hesitation or weakness.

While there may be a pervasive bias against people who have left the workforce for a hiatus, how you handle it can make all the difference in your job search.

 

 

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If you’re ready for to end your hiatus, or are looking for a new job, contact one of our recruiters here at J.Patrick & Associates.

We are an Executive Recruiting firm that focuses on Executive Management, Sales, Marketing and Technical roles within Information Technology markets. We have over 20 years of experience recruiting in every aspect of AV/VTC/UC, Application, Storage, Information/Network Security, Mobile Technologies and Telecommunications.

 

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