J Patrick + Associates Blog

6 Ways To Refocus your Team and Get back to Making Deals

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Tue, Mar 07, 2017 @ 11:04 AM

6 Ways to Refocus Your Team and Get Back To Making Deals.png

It happens to the best managers - your team was cruising along, making deals and running like the well oiled machine you built it to be.

 But then something happens. The latest flu makes the rounds in the office picking your employees off one by one, or people are having a hard time refocusing after vacation.Whatever the reasons, it's time for you to refocus your team and get things ramped back up.

Here are some ideas to help guide you.

Wipe The Slate

A stockpile of work can be overwhelming, but there’s nothing worse than having fluff making the pile even higher. Take the time to go through projects and clear out irrelevant and outdated tasks. What seemed like an important project back in early July may no longer be applicable. Clear the decks so you can get the team working toward clear and achievable goals.

Make A Plan

Even if you had the whole year mapped out, now is the time to realign and reprioritze. The best way to get your team back into fighting shape is to present them with a game plan. Clear priorities and a newly energized effort helps set the tone. We are back and ready to start cranking out the deals!

Resurrect Boundaries

Dress code and Friday closing times aren’t the only things to get loosened up in the summertime. Boundaries and conventions have a habit of slipping as well. Take these days in the early part of September to re-establish the conventions that help make you the most productive. Close the door on your office or put your phone on Do Not Disturb for a few hours in the morning in order to give yourself the time you need to refocus. Do what you need to do to send the signal to your team that it’s nose to the grindstone time.

Authorize and Engage

Sometimes the best way to get the blood going, and to show your team they're valued, is to change things up. You've hired a cracker-jack team, now it's time to push them. Give an individual a new responsibility, enhance a particular group’s reach. This isn’t about playing favorites, but it is about creating new avenues for development, both individually and for the team as a whole.

A Little Competition Goes A Long Way

There’s nothing like a little friendly competition to get people back into fighting form. Creating a sales competition is a great way to get the blood going again.

If a sales competition is not pertinent to your business, then try a fundraising challenge or even plan a sporting event. The idea is to get the team reinvigorated and re-engaged both together, and individually.

Take the time to reinvigorate and re-engage your employees, and the benefits will be seen long past the close of the quarter.

Bui

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Career Strategies, Career Advice

How To Make The Most Of An Employment Gap

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Mon, Nov 28, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

How to Make the Most of An Employment Gap.png
Returning to the workforce after a hiatus (either planned or involuntary) accounting for a gap in employment can be daunting. But whether you’ve been out of the job market for a few months or a number of years, there are a number of things you can do to ensure that prospective employers view your hiatus as time well spent, rather than damaging blank space on your resume.

Embrace the Gap

As much as you may want to try to make an employment gap disappear when getting back into the workforce, you must embrace it. You are much better off accounting for it, than trying to make believe it never happened. If for example, your hiatus was devoted to raising children, include it as such on your resume: 2011-2016 Time off to stay at home with my children/care for parents etc. Be clear and honest, and know that having taken time off doesn’t make you a less valuable employment prospect.

Highlight Volunteer Work

It may be tempting to minimize the impact volunteer work may have on your career, but if you step back, you you'll see that you gained valuable skills and experience by working with a non-for profit institution or school. By highlighting this experience you are showing prospective employers that you are willing to use your skills to be a positive force in your community, that you are passionate about certain causes, and you are engaged in building new skill sets.

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Don’t forget to avail yourself of those connections you made when volunteering when you’re looking for your next position. Even if they are not able to help connect you with prospective employers, they can write recommendations for your LinkedIn profile and provide you with endorsements.

Keep Learning

Employers will be less apt to balk at a gap if you’ve been busy working on your education. And understand this is not a bias that’s limited to University or degree work. Take the time during your hiatus to get current with certifications and trainings and learn new skills. Employers will see you’ve been dedicated to keeping your skill sharp, and are returning up to date with the latest trends in your sector.

Practice Your Story

When it comes to the interview, you need to be able to explain your hiatus in a way that allows you to be seen as an exciting prospect. Don't fall to the temptation to apologize for your hiatus. All that's called for is a concise explanationto help remove any doubts of your readiness and appeal to a potential employer. Know what you have to offer and be ready to voice it in just a few sentences. Understanding how to tell your story may take some time and practice, but it will deliver dividends when you are pitching yourself for a job.

Practice telling your story with both friends and people who don't know you so well - it will help strenghten your pitch and work out any hesitation or weakness.

While there may be a pervasive bias against people who have left the workforce for a hiatus, how you handle it can make all the difference in your job search.

If you’re ready for to end your hiatus, or are looking for a new job, contact one of our recruiters here at J.Patrick & Associates. We are an Executive Recruiting firm that focuses on Executive Management, Sales, Marketing and Technical roles within Information Technology markets. We have over 20 years of experience recruiting in every aspect of AV/VTC/UC, Application, Storage, Information/Network Security, Mobile Technologies and Telecommunications.

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Tags: Recruiter Tips, Job Search, Networking, Job Interviews

How To Make The Most Of An Employment Gap

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Tue, Aug 02, 2016 @ 11:00 AM

iStock_000042241860_Small.jpgReturning to the workforce after a hiatus (either planned or involuntary) accounting for a gap in employment can be daunting. But whether you’ve been out of the job market for a few months or a number of years, there are a number of things you can do to ensure that prospective employers view your hiatus as time well spent, rather than damaging blank space on your resume.

Embrace the Gap

As much as you may want to try to make an employment gap disappear when getting back into the workforce, you must embrace it. You are much better off accounting for it, than trying to make believe it never happened. If for example, your hiatus was devoted to raising children, include it as such on your resume: 2011-2016 Time off to stay at home with my children/care for parents etc. Be clear and honest, and know that having taken time off doesn’t make you a less valuable employment prospect.

Highlight Volunteer Work

It may be tempting to minimize the impact volunteer work may have on your career, but if you step back, you you'll see that you gained valuable skills and experience by working with a non-for profit institution or school. By highlighting this experience you are showing prospective employers that you are willing to use your skills to be a positive force in your community, that you are passionate about certain causes, and you are engaged in building new skill sets.

infographic3.2.jpg

Don’t forget to avail yourself of those connections you made when volunteering when you’re looking for your next position. Even if they are not able to help connect you with prospective employers, they can write recommendations for your LinkedIn profile and provide you with endorsements.

Keep Learning

Employers will be less apt to balk at a gap if you’ve been busy working on your education. And understand this is not a bias that’s limited to University or degree work. Take the time during your hiatus to get current with certifications and trainings and learn new skills. Employers will see you’ve been dedicated to keeping your skill sharp, and are returning up to date with the latest trends in your sector.

Practice Your Story

When it comes to the interview, you need to be able to explain your hiatus in a way that allows you to be seen as an exciting prospect. Don't fall to the temptation to apologize for your hiatus. All that's called for is a concise explanationto help remove any doubts of your readiness and appeal to a potential employer. Know what you have to offer and be ready to voice it in just a few sentences. Understanding how to tell your story may take some time and practice, but it will deliver dividends when you are pitching yourself for a job.

Practice telling your story with both friends and people who don't know you so well - it will help strenghten your pitch and work out any hesitation or weakness.

While there may be a pervasive bias against people who have left the workforce for a hiatus, how you handle it can make all the difference in your job search.

If you’re ready for to end your hiatus, or are looking for a new job, contact one of our recruiters here at J.Patrick & Associates.

We are an Executive Recruiting firm that focuses on Executive Management, Sales, Marketing and Technical roles within Information Technology markets. We have over 20 years of experience recruiting in every aspect of AV/VTC/UC, Application, Storage, Information/Network Security, Mobile Technologies and Telecommunications.

 

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Tags: Recruiter Tips, Job Search, Networking, Job Interviews

How to Work Effectively With An Executive Recruiter

Posted by Daniel Sullivan on Tue, Jan 19, 2016 @ 10:03 AM

Working with an executive recruiterEffective executive recruiter relationships can play an instrumental part in career advances for the rising professional and the established executive. Whether you’ve worked with executive recruiters before or this is your first time, there is a lot to know about how to build effective working relationships with recruiters. To have an effective relationship with an executive recruiter, it is important to understand the business’s business model and role you play as a potential candidate represented by an executive recruiter. Job seekers that fail to recognize ‘how it works’ with an executive recruiter often find themselves frustrated and unrepresented. Keep in mind these eight points when working with an executive recruiter:

 

 

1) Realize the executive recruiter works for the client company and not for you, the candidate.

Look at the payment trail: an executive recruiter is paid by the company to find the precisely right talent—and they are willing to pay a premium for it. Candidates that take the stance that the recruiter is working to find them a job have already showed the recruiter their lack of business savvy and self-centeredness. Don’t let this be you. Savvy candidates recognize the economic aspects of the relationship and works to be a resource to the recruiter. Recruiters want to work with savvy candidates.

2) Take the recruiter’s unsolicited calls

You never know when your new best friend is calling with the next best opportunity for you or someone in your network. These relationships are built over time, so do not ignore the calls and consider it another form of professional networking.

3) Develop an online relationship with recruiters

You can likely find them on LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, and Facebook. Building these relationship can help get a foot in the door, but be careful—tweeting a recruiter every day about your resume and job hunt can be just as irritating for them as flooding their inbox. Just as you would in-person, cultivate a relationship over time and give before you receive.

4) If the job lead is not right for you, help the recruiter with applicable leads and information whenever feasible

A recruiter’s lifeline is found in the information he/she receives. By providing leads, you are not only are you helping your network (kudos!), but helping a recruiter can pay dividends in opportunity and in karma. Good recruiters will go the extra mile for people who provide them quality information. So if you help them, savvy recruiters will help you.

5) Don't waste your recruiter's time

Do not test the waters with a recruiter—do that on your own time. If you waste a recruiter’s time once, rest assured you will not get the opportunity to do that again.

6) Make yourself worthy of the recruiter receiving a 25% fee from a company who hires you

As I mentioned in #1, companies are paying recruiters to find the cream of the crop. The hard-to-find, desirable candidate that the company cannot find on their own. So if that is not you, apply to the company directly on your own. This is a simple lesson in economics. To be placed by a recruiter, you need to have a background or skill set that warrants a fee to be paid that hovers around 25% of your salary. So help the recruiter market you by being fabulous and in-demand in the first place. If you cannot be placed by a recruiter, it does not mean you won’t get hired at all, it just means you may have to go a different, more direct route (not a bad thing, by the way—a majority of candidates are hired directly).

7) Give the recruiter what they need

Some recruiters may ask for references or writing samples—whatever it may be, give the recruiter what they ask for during the appropriate phase in the process. Just like winning over an employer, you have to win over a recruiter. Remember that recruiters don’t work for the candidates, so if you send recruiters your information without giving them exactly what they want, they may not work with you.

8) Have your resume in a reverse chronological format

Do not use functional resume formats or skills resume summaries. Recruiters find those useless, so do not use those.Executive resume formats are essential to making the best first impression with a recruiter.  I also suggest not to go back more than 15 to 20 years for most professionals. While there are exceptions for every rule, erring on the side of less is typically better for most executives. Frankly, you will not get hired in today’s market, nor can a recruiter get a fee, for something you did 20+ years ago. Keep it recent and relevant. 

Working effectively with a good recruiter is like a lot of other relationships you have developed in life. Like all worthy relationships, these require time and research. If you find you are not getting calls back from executive recruiters, shift gears and put in as much effort with an executive recruiter as you do with other professional relationships. You will soon find that you will be well on your way to having a successful dealings with the right executive recruiters. 

Written by Lisa Rangel, Executive Resume Writer

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Job Search

7 Simple LinkedIn Profile Updates To Attract Recruiters

Posted by Alysa Wishingrad on Mon, Dec 21, 2015 @ 10:30 AM

Recruiter Friendly LinkedIn Profile

A job search is as much about being visible online as it is about finding the right placement. Since  94% of recruiters use LinkedIn to vet candidates, if your online presence and professional branding is not up to par, then chances are you might be invisible to recruiters and hiring managers.  Even if you are the perfect candidate for a job, recruiters are far less likely to either find you, or consider you a viable candidate if you don’t have a strong and well-constructed LinkedIn page.

Make certain that these 7 key components of your LinkedIn profile are built in a way to help you stand out from the crowd.

1) Picture

Social media is first and foremost a visual medium - and your photo is one of the very first things a recruiter’s eye will be looking for when they land on your LinkedIn page. Your profile picture needs to be a polished, well-lit headshot that represents your personal brand and is appropriate to your industry.

How do you know what that is? 

Look over the profiles of others in your field for a good idea of how you should represent yourself. This is not the place to broadcast your individuality, but rather to match a face to your accomplishments.

2) Headline

This is the 1-3 lines that appear right under your name. Simply relying on the default settings to populate your headline with your job description would be to sell yourself short. Take the time to write a headline that is both active and provides a benefit to the reader.

A sterling example of this can be found on the LinkedIn profile of Koka Sexton, who is a member of the LinkedIn Corporate Communications team. He doesn’t simply refer to himself as “Manager of Social Media and Marketing.” Rather, his headline reads: “Building formulas of success with content marketing and social media. Delivering the vision for Social Selling evolution.”

3) Summary

You have about 2000 characters to showcase your professional strengths to a specific audience. If you are actively searching for a job, that audience is both prospective employers and recruiters. Written in an intelligent, memorable and professional manner, this is where you have the opportunity to tell your story. Write in the first person in order to hook the reader and to help them to understand how your experience has led you to this point in your career.  

Here again, make certain to include keywords related to your current position as well as where you want to go next. This is where your professional personality can shine; use this space to tell recruiters exactly who you are and what you have to offer.

4) Experience

Your work history is a fundamental part of your LinkedIn profile. The chronological listing of how long you were at a position, your job title, responsibilities and accomplishments is important but should not be a cut and paste of your resume. Use this as a place to highlight what you have to offer and to build the picture of a high performer.

Highlight specific projects where you met or exceeded goals and quotas. Did you reduce company expenses or perhaps  built a team or project from the ground up? Include facts and figures and if appropriate include some well-selected related media content or documents. All of these are ways to give a recruiter supporting evidence of your successes.

5) Connections & Endorsements

This area is where you provide social proof of your worth in the marketplace. Even the most well groomed profile with only 20-30 connections is not going to do you a service.

If you are just starting out in your chosen field, spend the time to make connections with others in the industry. Seek out high performing professionals and thought leaders to connect with. Follow them and read their profiles and associated documents.

You should also join, and more importantly, participate in groups related to your field of expertise and your industry. Not only does this serve to expand your contacts,  it also lends credence and gravity to your professionalism.

Endorse your co-workers and colleagues and they will return the favor. Think of endorsements as the common currency of LinkedIn - it doesn’t cost you anything to endorse people whom you believe in, and the action will come back to you in kind.

6) Recommendations

This is one place that quantity is not nearly as important as quality. What matters is that your recommendations are specific and speak to your strengths. Seek out recommendations from several sources; managers, customers, peers, professors, vendors, and other people you’ve done business with. Tell them what it is you are looking for them to speak to about your work, and let them help sell you to recruiters and prospective employers.

7) Status

Use your status to post about projects related to your field, share articles or news and announce what you are up to professionally. Displaying enticing content helps to make you more “clickable” - and promotes you as a reliable resource.

HIGH VISIBILITY =  HIGH PROBABILITY

Taking the time time to build your presence on LinkedIn so that recruiters can find you is vital in today’s job market - it’s a crowded field - you have to give yourself every advantage to stand out. It’s a tall order to be thorough, concise and creative. But if you can make all 7 of these key components work for you, you’ll exponentially increase your chances of recruiters finding you AND placing you in your next job.

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Social Media

Why Recruiters Ask For Desired Salary Early On (And What to Do About It)

Posted by Daniel Sullivan on Tue, Dec 08, 2015 @ 11:00 AM

Desired salary questionYou may have noticed on your job hunt that recruiters get down to business fast. In fact, you may be surprised that they are asking a candidate about their desired salary right off the bat. It may have even rubbed you the wrong way.

The truth is that this practice isn’t going anywhere. Below you’ll find out why and how to handle the question when it comes up.

Why recruiters need to ask…

Not all candidates have realistic expectations. In fact, experience tells recruiters that some candidates don’t even live on the same planet when it comes to how much they want to be compensated.

If this is the case then why bother with a candidate who clearly has totally unrealistic expectations? A recruiter’s client may be willing to negotiate, but only within reason.

You also have to consider it from the recruiter’s perspective. If they don’t ask a candidate about their salary, pass them along to their client and then it turns out their expectations are unrealistic then they have just wasted the employer’s time. That employer will make sure heads roll if the recruiter didn’t ask you upfront what the candidate’s expectations were. Since recruiters get paid by the companies they recruit for they can’t run that risk.

Now, if you are an experienced candidate you should be paid at least market rate. If for whatever reason the proposed salary is below market rate then this is something you should explore during the interview.

Why you shouldn’t be offended…

Whenever you’ve needed a service from someone most people often ask about rates early on in the process. In fact, money is usually the top concern. At the end of the day there’s no need to fall in love with a service provider who is way above your budget. Why should a salary be any different?Furthermore, how you react and respond to the question is part of the interview. In other words, if you act offended then that tells the recruiter about how you deal with things that don’t go as planned.

How to answer the salary question…

If you are asked what you were making there’s nothing else to do but to tell them the truth. Hold your head up high and drop the number without any excuses or apologies. It is what it is.

If you are asked what salary you are looking for, answer with the range of salary or total compensation that you have been interviewing for…Do not start with, “I want…” or “I am looking for…” Answer with, “I am interviewing for positions in the ____ to ____ range.” Answering in this manner does two things. First, it lets them know that you’ve got other companies calling you for positions at that pay rate (which always works in your favor when it comes to negotiating). Second, this is a subtle way of letting them know that the market thinks you are worth it with an external source (others calling you to interview for positions paying that level you cite).

If you haven’t been called in for any interviews yet or you just started the job search, do some research and see what the going rate is for this position. Then answer with the range the same way confidently, based on your research and skill set. Sometimes you have to fake it until you make it.

Written by Lisa Rangel, Executive Resume Writer 

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Job Search

5 Ways to Blow Your Interview Out of the Water

Posted by Glenda Gregorio on Mon, Nov 23, 2015 @ 11:00 AM

Are you prepared for your job interview?

Preparing for the interview takes more than a simple Google search of common interview questions. To make a great first impression you should use every tool in your toolbox to make you a remarkable applicant. Preparing for the interview will help to ease your nerves and ensure that you are ready to speak about your skills and accomplishments like the expert that you are! Here are some tips to help you shine during your interview.

Self-preparation

Start with your resume

You will have to speak about everything in your resume in great detail. Make sure to have key points to talk about your resume. Review your resume to make sure that you have not stretched the truth in certain areas.

 Question preparation

Spend some time preparing for the actual interview questions, think about ones that may come up and develop answers that will address what the employer is looking for. Also, formulate questions that you'd like to ask the interviewer, such as "what was the most challenging project you have worked on while your time in the company?" or "what is the next step in moving foward?" Rehearse your potential answers, but on the day of the interview make it sound natural and not rehearsed. 

Company Research

Do an in depth reserach on the company. Learn about the company's mission, history, news events, conferences, and future development. Don't forget to check out the company's social media accounts to discover what the company is doing on a day-to-day basis and its interaction within their industry. You'd be surprised by how much information you can find on companies' social media accounts! Nicole, a Hiring Expert at ManpowerGroup says,"By thoroughly reseraching the employer you increase your chances of making a positive and memorable first impression. I would recommend digging deeper than just general knowledge about an employer.
  • What are the services / products that the company offers?
  • How large is the company? Other locations? How many employees?
  • What is their philosophy or mission statement?
  • Do they have other locations?
  • Have they won any awards or received recognition?
  • Do they give back to the community?
  • Who are their competitors?
  • Research the executives and the person you are interviewing with.
The more you have the better impression you will make and be more confident you will feel in the interview."

Leverage Your Network

Make sure to use all of your resources to learn about the internal aspects of the company, especially your LinkedIn connections. Do you know someone who works in the company? Have you attended events of conferences that the company has also attended? Mentioning current employees and events or conferences attended by the company can show how much you know about the company and how quickly you can assimilate to their company. 

Talk to Your Recruiter

Make sure to talk to your recruiter! Your recruiter is one of you most valuable resources and should be used to prep and coach you for the interview. Your recruiter will have valuable information on the ocmpany that can boost your interview such as specific questions to prepare for, the personality of the hiring manager or the qualities searched for in candidates. Your recruiter can be your potential lifeline and make a difference in the outcome of the interview. 

Day of the Interview Preparation

Arrive on Time

Make sure to arrive at least 15 minutes before the interview, to allow for time to fill out additional paperwork. It will also make a great first impression on the interviewer. 

 Attire

Make sure to look as professional as possible! While some companies have a more business casual atmosphere, other prefer the traditional button down and pressed suit image. Make sure that your attire matches the company dress code. For either type of company, make sure your clothes are clean, ironed, and your shoes shined. As the old saying goes "first impression are the most lasting." 

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Job Interviews

How To Get The Job As An Outsider

Posted by Daniel Sullivan on Thu, Oct 08, 2015 @ 11:00 AM

Get the Job as an OutsiderIt’s no secret that executive level positions are often times given to internal employees. They’ve been with the company a while, they know how it works and the company already feels comfortable with them.

This can present some unique obstacles to an outsider trying to get in. However, it’s not impossible to make a move to an executive level position in another company. All it requires is learning how to leverage the obstacles to your advantage.

 

Explain How Being From the Outside is a Strength

Research suggests that when people are trying to find a creative solution to a problem it oftentimes requires that they find an outsider. Simply put, the outsider has no preconceived notions about the situation, they also aren’t completely involved in it, whereas insiders may be a little too invested and therefore blinded to solutions.

The ability to see a situation from the outside enables a person to find solutions easily. They can see holes where others can’t. They can also think outside of the box. This is a huge strength to play on when vying for a position within another company.

Here’s another strength: you may know more about the market and the competition than they do. Being from the outside enables you to see the company as a consumer. This a whole new way of looking at it that can be extremely beneficial when implementing marketing campaigns, revamping customer service or addressing product development issues.

Reach Out to the Right Contacts

Your best bet to getting any position (externally or not) is to come in with a personal referral in hand.

Connect with individuals within the company you’re looking to get into. You could start with your personal network and then expand outward with a LinkedIn search. You can also find many of these individuals partaking in LinkedIn groups.

The key is to find individuals who have enough clout within the company to help sway high level hiring decisions.

Please keep in mind that just as with in-person networking events there is etiquette to follow when networking on LinkedIn. Customize your connection message, have a genuine interest in this person, and get to know them on a professional level.

Look for Companies That Are Open to Outside Management

Not all companies have policies in place that allow them to hire outside management. You don’t need to worry about them.

Instead, find companies that are flexible about opening up management positions to outsiders. This is easier than most people would think. Chances are that if they are posting an ad publicly then they are open to it, otherwise why would they bother when they can just look internally?

Big job boards can get convoluted easily. Instead try specific searches on LinkedIn or go straight to the company’s Careers section on their website.

You should also stay open to recruiters. Take their unsolicited calls and hear what they have to say. They’ve been hired by companies to search the candidate pool and find the best people.

By leveraging your skills and being strategic you can move up by moving over and get the job as an outsider.

Written by Lisa Rangel, Executive Resume Writer

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Job Search, Networking, Career Strategies

Numbers Talk: Why You Must Use Social Media in Your Job Search

Posted by Daniel Sullivan on Thu, Aug 27, 2015 @ 11:00 AM

must use social media in your job search

You have read so many articles like “14 Ways to Use Twitter to Land a Job” or “8 Ways to Get Recruiters to Find You on LinkedIn.” You may have
read many of ours giving this type of premier advice…but here is the million dollar question…

Are you doing it? Any of It? Even a little bit of it?

You know the answer to that…

I have to believe you do not need any more convincing as to why you must use social media in your job search…but in case you do here are some numbers to consider.

Social recruiting is on the rise.

The use of social media to find candidates in recent years has only increased as recruiters learn how to maneuver it. And guess what…it’s not going anywhere.

According to a recent Jobvite study 73 percent of recruiters have already hired someone using social media. Furthermore, 93 percent of recruiters will look at a candidate’s social media profiles before making a decision.

In fact, recruiters are now taking social media profiles more seriously. According to the study, 55 percent of recruiters changed their minds about a candidate based on something they had on their social media profile. (This is why it’s imperative that you be careful about what you post on social media.)

If that’s not enough to convince you consider this: 73% of recruiters plan to invest even more in social recruiting. It’s working for them, and as such you should consider getting in on the game.

Social networks by the numbers.

LinkedIn is a recruiter’s top choice for finding candidates with 94% of them utilizing it. Facebook is in second place with 66 percent of them using it to find candidates.

Below you’ll find a breakdown of what recruiters have already used to hire candidates:

• 79% of recruiters have hired someone using LinkedIn
• 26% of recruiters have hired someone using Facebook
• 14% of recruiters hired someone using Twitter

This means that social media isn’t a fad. Social hiring is happening right now as we speak.

What recruiters do on social media.

On Facebook recruiters tend to focus on the employer brand (59%), post jobs (48%) and generate employee referrals (51%). While Twitter isn’t as widely used, recruiters are still using it for much of the same. In other words, if you’re not active on either of these networks you’re missing out on about half of the job opportunities available to you.

Of course, LinkedIn is the recruiter goldmine with 95 percent of them using it to search for and contact candidates. They also use it to keep tabs on potential candidates for future openings.

Social media as a means of getting referrals.

Another Jobvite study found that 55 percent of referrals get hired faster than candidates from company career sites. The rise of social media has made it easier than ever to create contacts and build relationships with referrals.

Numbers don’t lie. If you’re not on social media then you’re missing out on major job opportunities. You can download our free eBook to help set yourself up for social media success.

Written by Lisa Rangel, Executive Resume Writer

If you are interested in working with Lisa Rangel, an accomplished executive resume writer, social media profile writer and job search consultant, to achieve social media exposure and interviews you want, sign up for an exploratory call now and learn about the Chameleon Resumes services that can help you land your next role.

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Social Media, Job Search, Career Strategies

How an Executive Recruiting Firm Can Help Solve Your Hiring Problems

Posted by Daniel Sullivan on Thu, Jun 11, 2015 @ 10:00 AM

Executive Recruiting

It can take weeks if not months to find one high-talent placement. Candidates can sometimes feel lost among a sea of applicants. LinkedIn, job boards and other services expand the candidate pool but can make it difficult to get through the volume. Investing in high yield recruiting can be the answer. The executive recruiting firm J. Patrick and Associates knows  how to deliver exceptional talent while saving time and money.

Connection:  Executive Recruiters are connected to the talent you need to find. This connection allows your Executive Recruiters to search thousands of candidates for each and every hiring decision. By employing a reputable placement agency, you'll  know that important skills have been identified and  high numbers of quality candidates have been screened.  By the time your select candidates are in front of you, you'll know that they have been pulled from the best.

Confidence: The number one complaint we hear from hiring managers is that of confidence. Specifically, how does the hiring manager know, really know that a candidate will be worth the time and money to train? Once again, executive recruiting is the answer. Savvy recruiters leverage cutting edge search tools to your benefit. With an established, successful recruiting firm, you’ll interview the best talent possible.

Cost: The impact of a bad hire spreads throughout and organization. Working with a successful recruiter can help ensure these mistakes are minimized. In minutes, a professional recruiter can scan hundreds of records that would take an HR hiring manager days to find. A professional recruiter applies screening protocols ensuring that the best candidates are delivered to you. When it comes to placing top talent, using a proven recruiting agency will always be worth the investment.

The value of working with an Executive Recruiting agency is highlighted by a recent Information Security placement made by J. Patrick and Associates.

A global leader of application delivery and application security solutions for virtual and cloud data centers wanted to expand their engineering team. The position in question required the candidate to have deep technical experience across all facets of application delivery and application security solutions, as well as virtualization, Private / Hybrid Cloud and Software-Defined Networking (SDN), and their numerous applications in a variety of verticals. It would take some digging to find qualified candidates.

Beyond the technical requirements, the candidate also needed solution-selling experience and hands-on experience with the provider’s intricate products and solutions portfolio. He/she had to provide an initial presentation with customers and sales teams and perform the installation. The company interviewed dozens of candidates suggested by its recruiting firms but were unable to find a candidate that met all of the provider’s requirements. After nine months, the organization decided to explore another recruitment agency option.

That’s when J. Patrick & Associates became involved and executed multiple candidate searches in the Chicago area. The company identified Sales Engineers at the security solutions provider’s direct competitors. Then it turned to trusted industry referrals to further its search.

J. Patrick & Associates cold-called and thoroughly screened dozens of qualified professionals by using its database of over half a million candidates and a global Information Security referral network. J. Patrick's recruiters disqualified approximately 30 candidates for every one that moved on to the next phase, the technical screen.  The recruiters at J. Patrick successfully identified two qualified Sales Engineer candidates that met all of the client’s job requirements within a 30-day period.

The security solutions provider hired one of the Sales Engineer candidates, now a consistent top performer several years running. Since then, the company has retained J. Patrick & Associates as its primary recruiting firm. In the last year, J. Patrick & Associates has successfully placed more than 10 professionals in eight other positions with the organization and is currently working with the provider to fill 12 new Sales and Engineering positions.

Tags: Recruiter Tips, Networking, Information Security, HR and Hiring